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The votes are in, and one entry has come out on top in the contest to give George W. Bush a suitable descriptive name.

President Bush's power to appoint judges is one he hardly deserves because of the way he achieved his office.

We're sorry, but Jules Fieffer's two-page editorial-cartoon spread can be seen only in our print edition, as it is not technically feasible at this time to post them on our website.

As he goes, so goes the Senate.

A sit-in at the university highlights the gulf between a great educational institution and the unconscionable working conditions many of its employees experience there.

A grassroots movement for immigrant legalization is gathering strength.

What exactly Bob Kerrey did one night in a Vietnamese community should concern every citizen.

Prevention and treatment require a focus on overall health and development.

A parody of Gone With the Wind has run into legal trouble: too revealing of the real nature of slavery?

John Friedman reviews Edwin Black's IBM and the Holocaust and Reinhold Billstein et al.'s Working for the Enemy.

The war was years ago, but that does not excuse misrepresenting one's participation in it.

Debra Cash visits the Museum of Modern Art's "Workspheres" exhibition.

He's an archconservative who thinks big and knows how to get things done.

With NAFTA as an ugly precedent, the proposed trade pact is generating serious opposition from a number of social and economic sources.

It's back to the future with the George W. Bush who is leading the nation--in the hard-edged style of the recent fiasco in Florida.

A campaign to help sick people in need of unaffordable medicines is clashing with forces in the global pharmaceutical industry.

The death penalty needs to be thought through by liberals, and its acceptance or rejection cannot be á la carte.

America's provocative military posture in Asia makes war with China more likely.

A funny thing happened on the way to the election--here's what it portends.

The former FCC chairman says he's bitter about the effective dismantling of his low-power radio plan. Under his successor, such an idea won't even get raised.

Studies on the effects of childcare on the young are colored by researchers' views about educated women who go to work.