Quantcast

Articles | The Nation

News and Features

"We have come to give flowers instead of missiles," a flower producer
repeated, as he gave roses to the passers-by in the main square of
Mexico City on Friday morning, hours after the US attack

I came across a sign the other day, inelegantly scrawled on cardboard
and stuck to a telephone pole. It read Fuck Bush.

Dear America:

This is a difficult letter to write, because I'm no longer sure who
you are. Some of you may be having the same trouble.

Clear eminence without whom I would be
nothing oh great provision never seen
barely acknowledged even wished away

William O. Douglas was a judicial record-setter.

Someone once described Graham Greene as the novelist of decolonizing
Britain.

Richard Sennett is best known in the United States for his 1972 book
(written with Jonathan Cobb), The Hidden Injuries of Class. That
study of white working-class men, how they understoo

The Spanish capital took on the air of a battle zone the weekend after
the war began, as antiwar protesters clashed with riot police throughout
the city.

The angry guy with the shoe.

Those who have been watching the war on television are familiar with the video footage: after the US military took cont...

While Michael Moore was leaving the stage of the Kodak Theater during the seventy-fifth annual Academy Awards ceremony, after calling George W.


THE INTELLIGENCE SOURCE SPEAKS

Oxford, England

You can be forgiven if, like me, you were a bit depressed to hear that the war had started. But this is no time to go into a funk.

There's no better antidote to orange alerts and duct-tape dictums than good fiction, and if the terrorists occupying the White House have shot your attention span, try a book of short stories.

The Bush Administration's plan to keep several hundred thousand US and British troops for years in a divided, heavily armed Muslim country will make all Americans "targets of opportunity" for ter

Among the approximately 150,000 people who took to the streets of New York on March 22 to protest the US invasion of Iraq were six Nation interns.

Well, we can rest assured that the Academy Awards voting is not rigged.

Going into Sunday night's Oscars' ceremony, it was a safe bet that, if the people who run the movie-industry's annual prize patrol had their druthers, antiwar filmmaker Michael Moore would not have gotten anywhere near a microphone. Moore, who wore a badge reading "Shoot Movies, Not Iraqis," when he accepted an Independent Spirit Award the night before, had promised that if he won an Oscar he would use his acceptance speech to make an issue of Bush's war. With right-wing talk radio hosts and members of the Congressional Yahoo Caucus already ranting and roaring about unpatriotic celebrities, the pressure was on to avoid controversy.

But, to a greater extent than just about anyone in Hollywood, Moore embraces controversy. And the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences voters who decided the winner of the best documentary feature competition embraced Moore's "Bowling for Columbine," a hilarious and haunting examination of gun violence, poverty and the media in America. The Academy voters gave the rabble-rousing filmmaker, author and activist an Oscar for his documentary -- as well as an opportunity to deliver 45 seconds of "message" to the world.

****HELP GREET BUSH IN FLORIDA****

George W. Bush is going to Florida tomorrow. Help the local progresive community give him a proper greeting. He'll be at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa to rally the troops and meet with leaders of the military's Central Command. In response, there will be a Peace Rally at 10:00 am at Bayshore Blvd. and Bay-to-Bay in Tampa, Florida. For more information, please contact Penny at Reparations@aol.com or call 727-894-6997.

************************************

"In all good conscience, I cannot and will not vote for a resolution that supports and endorses a failed policy that led us to war," declared US Rep. John Lewis, D-Georgia, as he explained why he could not join most members of Congress in backing what Republican leaders on the House of Representatives cynically described as a simple "support our troops" resolution.

The resolution, which passed the House by an overwhelming margin Friday morning, did express support for soldiers who have been ordered into combat in Iraq, and for the families of young men and women who wear the uniform of the United States in a time of war. But those sentiments came wrapped in a highly partisan expression of "unequivocal support . . . for [President Bush's] firm leadership and decisive action in the conduct of military operations in Iraq." After a failed attempt by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-California, to extract the more extreme cheerleading language – perhaps by paralleling the more reasoned wording of the resolution that passed the Senate 99-1 on Thursday – the measure passed the House by a vote of 392-11, with 22 members voting "present."

Many of the House Democrats and Republicans who opposed the October "use of force" resolution that the administration used as justification for launching the war expressed discomfort with Friday's "unequivocal support" statement. But most, including Pelosi, backed it.

In the last note that 23-year-old American college student Rachel Corrie wrote to her father from a Palestinian community on the Gaza Strip, she thanked Craig Corrie for stepping up his antiwar activism in the United States and urged him to continue speaking out against a US-led attack on Iraq. Four days later, on March 16, Rachel was crushed by an Israeli bulldozer as she attempted to prevent the destruction of a Palestinian physician's home. Even as he and Rachel's mother mourned the death of their daughter, they carried out her wish Wednesday on the terrace of the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC.

With three Democratic members of Congress from Rachel Corrie's homestate of Washington -- Jim McDermott and Brian Baird, who voted against the October resolution authorizing the use of force against Iraq, and Adam Smith, who voted for it -- standing behind them, Craig and Cynthia Corrie read a statement that poignantly added their daughter's voice to the chorus of corncern regarding the Bush Administration's launch of a preemptive war with Iraq.

"We are speaking out today because of Rachel's fears about the impact of a war with Iraq on the people in the Occupied Territories. She reported to us that her Palestinian friends were afraid that with all eyes on Iraq, the Israeli Defense Forces would escalate activity in the Occupied Territories. Rachel wanted to be in Gaza if that happened," explained Cynthia Corrie. "In the last six weeks, Rachel became our eyes and ears for Rafah, a city at the southern tip of Gaza. Now that she's no longer there, we are asking members of Congress and, truly, all the world to watch and listen."

The Nation elicited comment on reaction to the war against Iraq from all corners of the globe.

George Bush is supposed to be the cowboy, Tony Blair the sidekick--or,
in some versions, the presidential poodle.

"This is what democracy looks like" chanted twenty-four antiwar
demonstrators as they were arrested outside Toledo's Navy and Air Force
recruitment office on the day George W.

Is the government's foreign policy apparatus a casualty of war? The
recent resignations of two career State Department officials, who left
to protest George W.