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'STACKED DECALOGUE'--NO DRIVEL!

Atlanta

We're all familiar with Arnold the actor, but who writes the script if he wins?

Scott McClellan, White House press secretary, falsely accused me of rigging the truth. But before we get to that, the news of the day: the Bush administrati...

Did retired General Anthony Zinni really call George W. Bush's war in Iraq a "brain fart"? That seems to be the case. But first, some background.

On...

There's been scant notice of refugees being brutally driven out of Chechnya.



DEAN'S LIST

New York City

Edward Said closed one of his last published essays with the lines: "We are in for many more years of turmoil and misery in the Middle East, where one of the main problems is, to put it as plainly as possible, U.S. power. What the U.S. refuses to see clearly it can hardly hope to remedy."

Said's frustration was obvious, but so too was the determination of the man Salman Rushdie once said "reads the world as closely as he reads books." No one worked harder and longer than Said to awaken Americans to the damage their government's policies had done to the prospects for peace and justice in the Middle East. It cannot be said that he succeeded in that mission, but nor can it be said that he failed. If successive presidents refused to listen to Said's wise counsel, millions of citizens were influenced directly and indirectly by his speeches, writing and tireless advocacy. To the extent that there has been a broadening of sympathy for the cause of Palestine and Palestinians in the United States in recent years -- especially among younger Americans -- it can be traced in no small measure to the work of the world-renowned scholar, author, critic and activist who has died Thursday at age 67 after a long battle with leukemia.

Born in 1935 in British-ruled Palestine, and raised in Egypt, Said came to the United States as a student. He would eventually become a professor at Columbia University and the author of internationally acclaimed books on literature, music, culture and imperialism. His groundbreaking 1978 book, Orientalism, forced open a long-delayed and still unfinished debate about Western perceptions of Islam.

The Women Legislators Lobby (WiLL) is a professional organization of state legislators formed in 1990 as a program of WAND (Women's Action for New Directions). WAND's mission is to empower women to act politically to reduce militarism and violence, and to redirect excessive military spending toward unmet human and environmental needs. WAND/WiLL honors Helen Thomas with the 2003 BellSouth Torchbearer Award for her lifelong willingness to ask the "tough" questions and her recent commentary speaking truth to power.

They are bicycling into the sun.

He has a dhoti on under his coat

and a briefcase with LYRIC

marked in big letters.

The setting is a one-room schoolhouse, which is momentarily unoccupied
except for a pair of turtles.

A refugee from Nazism and a distinguished New York psychoanalyst, Sandor
Rado had thought long and deeply about Hitler's takeover of Germany.
Years ago, the writer Otto Friedrich interviewed hi

On a hot, dusty summer day in 1998, I drove with friends from Smolensk
to the village of Zagor'e to meet Ivan Tvardovsky, a survivor of
Stalin's forced-labor camps and the brother of the renown

Hope has turned to bitterness as reform efforts have been crushed by the
regime.

The President started telling whoppers long before Iraq.

We live in interesting times. These days we can all pretty much
acknowledge that race does not exist as a scientific construct; these
days, we can all agree that racism is wrong.

Let's start with a passage from Alan Dershowitz's latest book, The
Case for Israel
, now slithering into the upper tier of Amazon's
sales charts.

LESSONS FROM ALGIERS

You tell us, with a casual by-the-way,
Iraq was not behind that awful day,
As if we'd never heard your staff and you
Implying just the opposite was true.

As a law school dean, I was much taken with a statement from Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor's landmark opinion in the University of Michigan
case: "Law schools represent the training ground for a

If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on civil liberties and privacy, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to The Nation Digital Archive, a collection of every issue of The Nation ever published since 1865.

I did a double take when I got to the eighth paragraph of the
Washington Post's eleven-paragraph August 21 news story on Kathy
Boudin's parole.

The media shorthand for retired Gen. Wesley Clark's much-anticipated
presidential candidacy made him the "antiwar warrior," a military man
fully aware of the folly of George Bush's Iraq war.

He's still misleading. Speaking at the United Nations on September 23,
George W.