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The late John Rawls was, by all accounts, a remarkably modest and
generous person, much beloved by his friends and students, and
profoundly uninterested in the kinds of fame and celebrity perks

While we wait for labor law reform, here are a few things unions can do.

In previous times of war fever, clear voices have called for a return to US ideals.

A new source of energy offers a way to wrench power from ever-fewer
hands.

Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers is Daniel
Ellsberg's story of his personal journey from being in the early 1960s a
"dedicated cold warrior" who supported America's e

If single women have been told once, they've been told a thousand times:
Don't think you're ever too successful or too young to have your ovaries
shrivel up and die. Use 'em or lose 'em!

A lot of nonsense has been written about the choreographer Twyla Tharp
and her hit Broadway show, Movin' Out, since it opened at the
Richard Rodgers Theatre on October 24.

Even without the aid of Smell-o-Vision, Charlie Kaufman's bedroom comes
across as dank.

The Democratic muddle continues in post-election hangover. The
corporate wing of the party, the Democratic Leadership Council, once
more urges the party to move even further to the right.

Secret societies are manna for conspiracy theorists, and few are more secret or more conspiracy-nourishing than Yale's Skull and Bones.

The President clearly does not want to know the truth about September 11.

A federal judge hands nine workers an unexpected victory in their battle against a law requiring citizenship for all airport screeners.

If President Bush had set out to undermine the credibility of the commission charged with probing the intelligence and security flaws that allowed the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks to succeed, he would have begun by naming as the chair someone with a track record of secrecy, double-dealing and bartering himself off to the highest bidder.

And so the president, who has resisted the investigation for more than a year, did just that.

With the selection of former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger to head the 10-member commission, Bush has signaled that he is more interested in covering for the intelligence establishment – and the administration's allies in corrupt oil-producing nations such as Saudi Arabia -- than in getting to the truth.

Asking Henry Kissinger to investigate government malfeasance or nonfeasance is akin to asking Slobodan Milosevic to investigate war crimes. Pretty damn akin...

What a lousy Christmas present.

Dr. Marc answers readers' question every other week. To send a query, click here.

Dear Dr. Madlaw,
   As a newly elected member of Congress, I am appalled at the high cost
of living in Washington. What's a hard-working public servant to do?

So let's join Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Logistics, and
Technology Edward "Pete" Aldridge at a recent Pentagon press briefing,
where he's addressing concerns about the Pentagon

If nothing shows in spyplane pics
And Blix finds nothing in the sticks,
That still won't put us in a fix.
We'll blame it on Iraqi tricks,

Now, here's what the deal's supposed to be: In exchange for greater
security you give up certain rights.

Critics of America's plans to oust Saddam Hussein militarily have
mounted powerful arguments, but not one has articulated a coherent
nonmilitary strategy to bring about the demise of the monstr