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"Many years have passed in which Palestinians were not really living. What we need is a huge change. And maybe then there will be peace."

The headline in Tuesday's editions of London's Guardian newspaper read: "No. 10 knew: Iraq no threat."

The headline in London's Daily Mirror shouted: "NO THREAT -- Revealed: Email from Blair's top man said Saddam was NOT imminent danger." The lead editorial in The Independent newspaper declared, "Now we know that No 10 did order a rewrite of the dossier to justify war."

For the most part, American media is doing a lousy job of following the British investigation of how Blair and his aides spun the case for war with Iraq. From a journalistic standard, that's bizarre because the story of official deceit in Britain is also the story of official deceit in the United States.

It sounds like a Texas wrestling match: Slim vs Dubya. But in a recent poll that asked about truthfulness, rapper Eminem scored higher than President Bush. According to a global marketing agency, Euro RSCG Worldwide, 53 percent of American adults aged 35-44 believe that Eminem's lyrics contain "more truth" than Bush's speeches. (62 percent in the 18-24 age group agreed.) It turns out that we may need to do a better job of protecting our kids from our President's gangsta' rap.

George Akerlof is becoming a household name. Well, sort of. The 2001 Nobel Prize Laureate for Economics, who teaches at Berkeley, was recently cited by Al Gore in his rousing speech to MoveOn at New York University.

Just a few days earlier, Akerlof had been quoted in the German magazine Der Spiegel condemning the Bush Administration as "the worst government the US has ever had in its more than 200 years of history." These words catapulted Akerlof to the top of Google for a few days but it's worth reading the full text of his illuminating interview with the German weekly for a look at how horrified another longtime member of the American establishment is at the extremism of the Bush Administration.

"This is not normal government policy," Akerlof says. "Now is the time for [American] people to engage in civil disobedience. I think it's time to protest as much as possible." When asked about the deficit, one of his many areas of professional expertise, Akerlof replied that with the current tax cuts, a realistic estimate would be in excess of six trillion, far more than the Administration is predicting.

Electricity has now been restored across much of the northeast region of Canada and the United States, but officials are urging consumers and businesses to conserve electricity to avoid the possibility of rolling blackouts to prevent the grid from becoming overburdened as it stabilizes after the worst power cuts in North American history.

At its peak, the blackout, thought now to have originated in Ohio, left more than 50 million people without power in eight US states and eastern Canada, including major cities like New York, Philadelphia, Detroit, Cleveland, Toronto and Ottawa.

The Nation offices, located in the Union Square area of Manhattan, were without power for about thirty-six hours, which meant that our website was temporarily unavailable, and our e-mail and phone systems were also down. Fortunately, everything seems to be functioning normally now.

Will there be an investigation into whether Bush administration officials violated the law and undermined national security in order to mount a political ve...

This letter, from our December 7, 1911 issue, and editorial, from October 27, 1962, are special selections from The Nation Digital Archive. If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on California, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to the Archive--an electronic database of every Nation article ever.

This essay, from the October 27, 1962, issue of The Nation, is a special selection from The Nation Digital Archive. If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on California, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to the Archive--an electronic database of every Nation article since 1865.

Direct Legislation in California

To the Editor of The Nation:

Here's our man, starring in a movie about himself.

If you want to read everything The Nation has ever published on Iraq, click here for information on how to acquire individual access to the Archive--an electronic database of every Nation article ever.

Beethoven has been particularly fortunate in his recent critics and
biographers.

I recently returned to dingy England after a road trip in America,
where, as usual, I failed to take any photographs.

Edward Burtynsky's photographs are large, colorful and mostly ravishing,
despite their subjects.

Activists say no to corporate giveaways.

The words "Al Gore" are properly understood to be synonymous with the
words "cautious politician." And yet speaking to MoveOn.org at New York
University recently, Gore gave voice to some plain-

Click here to read David Corn's Nation interview with Howard Dean.

Read special extracts from Jonathan Schell's new book, The Unconquerable World: Power, Nonviolence, and The Will of the People.