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It lacks beaches, but it does have the most mixed neighborhoods in California.

Opponents of the neoliberal model are demanding a new social contract.

A most remarkable event occurred in the weeks preceding the June 2000
announcement of the completion of the first draft of the human genome
DNA code: One of the leaders of the genome project pu

I first heard of Jon Beckwith in the mid-1970s, in a question framed by
my genetics professor: Why would anyone willfully disrupt a research
program designed to collect useful information on hu

In 1906, the French savant Pierre Duhem published a three-volume work
on Leonardo as scientist under the innocuous title Études sur
Leonard de Vinci.
It was the work's subtitle th

When James Agee wrote in these pages sixty years ago, he often
complained of the paltriness of this or that movie, as judged against
the events of the day.

George W. Bush has launched war with Iraq, a war that is unnecessary, unwise and illegal. In response, a wave of angry antiwar protests began to roll across Europe and the Middle East this morning. And in the US, the antiwar movement is calling for emergency actions nationwide.

United for Peace and Justice is planning vigils, rallies, walkouts and civil disobedience.

The Pledge of Resistance is staging nonviolent direct action to stop the flow of business as usual as long as the bombs continue falling.


BOMBS OVER BAGHDAD

Studio City, Calif.

The Bush Administration has launched a war against Iraq, a war that is unnecessary, unwise and illegal.

A few months ago, I was in a television studio with one of Washington's leading pro-war cheerleaders. After we finished our mini-debate, he asked if I thoug...

It appears that George W. Bush will get his war. But it will be a war begun in failure. Even as Republican and Democratic Congressional leaders in the United States dutifully signed up with promises of support or silence regarding a war many of them know to be unnecessary, the blunt reality is that this American president has failed to convince the world of the need for a war with Iraq.

The president's dramatic defeat in the court of international public opinion was acknowledged Monday, when the administration abandoned its doomed effort to win a go-ahead from the United Nations Security Council for warmaking.

That rejection of diplomacy was met with a diplomatic response from UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, who telegraphed his frustration with a read-between-the-lines statement to the effect that, "If the action is to take place without the support of the Council, its legitimacy will be questioned and the support for it will be diminished." Others were not so gentle in their assessment.

The island bit over the weekend was a revealing farce.

This article was originally published on March 18, 2003.

Repeat after me: This is what democracy looks like!

Repeat after me: This is what history feels like!

A movement the think tanks thought unthinkable.

President Bush ended an hour-long summit in the Azores today by giving the UN a deadline of 24 hours to act on a resolution authorizing war with Iraq, marking an abrupt end to six months of feverish but failing diplomacy in which world opinion grew steadily against a US invasion.

With little hope of passing a resolution, Bush signaled his intention to flout the Security Council and quickly unleash the more than 250,000 US troops currently massed near the Iraqi border.

Yesterday's global antiwar protests, which again saw millions of people worldwide come out to express outrage at Bush's plans for war, could be just a hint of opposition to come if and when war begins. Tonight, evening peace vigils are taking place around the world, starting in New Zealand and following sequentially in time zones in more than 2,800 cities in 104 countries.

George Bush is not the only one who has to fight a two-front war in the months ahead. So do progressives who want to take power in 2004--and beyond.

No one has made life on the campaign trail more difficult for several of the frontrunning candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination than US Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa.

Last October, Harkin joined Massachusetts Senator John Kerry, North Carolina Senator John Edwards, Connecticut Senator Joseph Lieberman and Missouri Representative Richard Gephardt in voting for the resolution that authorized President Bush to take military action against Iraq. But, last week, Harkin admitted that he has been wrong to believe the Bush Administration was serious about exploring diplomatic alternatives to war.

If Congress were to vote again, Harkin said, he would oppose the resolution. "I'm not going to be fooled twice," the Iowan told hometown media in Des Moines. "As I look back it sure looks like the administration was never serious about resolving the situation peacefully," said Harkin, who complained that Bush has acted "like the cowboy who rode out of Texas, all guns blazing."

Much to the frustration of the Bush Administration, France, Russia,
China and the other members of the United Nations Security Council
opposing the British-US resolution on Iraq have not bought

The presidential contest has begun, as usual, with the "money primary,"
in which major donors choose their favorites and weed out other
candidates, long before any citizen has an opportunity to

One of the first casualties of war may be those happy-talk forecasts of
a robust recovery once the bombing starts in Iraq, but a far more
momentous economic question accompanies Bush's invasion

Let's say you have a war to sell. You have the usual public relations
tools at your disposal: highly scripted press conferences, stories
leaked by White House officials to a compliant press.

During the Vietnam War the heavyweight boxing champion of the world,
Muhammad Ali, refused to serve in the Army.

Whose name stands out like banners made of Day-Glo?
The State Union of Serbia and Montenegro!
What sounds as if it's jerry-built by Lego?

That Fox News Channel advertisement on the back cover is not a parody.
We know it's hard to believe, but it's a real ad, and they paid good
money to run it, too.