Quantcast

Articles | The Nation

News and Features

So it looks like Rick Santorum won't go the way of Trent Lott.

It was the best of wars. It was the worst of wars. But did the war in
Iraq change anyone's mind?

The latest crisis with North Korea appears to be about the North finally
declaring that it has the bomb, but in fact it is about the Bush
Administration's inability to hide or control sharp int

With the close of the Iraq war--at least its first phase--the Bush
Administration has another opportunity to seek a lasting solution to the
Israel-Palestine conflict and to mend relations with

Compare the following two statements currently floating 'round the
blogosphere:

Tom Friedman doesn't care if the United States ever finds weapons of
mass destruction in Iraq.

About a month ago, George Soros sent me a letter along with a copy of a recent speech he'd delivered offering his views on "America's Role in the World." (I'm sure I was one of thousands to get the mailing.) Soros wrote that he was looking for a presidential candidate "who could articulate an alternative vision for America's role in the world and so far I have found two, Governor Howard Dean of Vermont and Senator John Kerry."

I thought of Soros' letter after reading that Kerry's campaign had blasted Dean's credentials as potential commander in chief. As Kerry's communications director, Chris Lehane, put it in attacking the former Vermont Governor's comment: "No serious candidate for the presidency has ever before suggested that he would compromise or tolerate an erosion of America's military supremacy." But who's talking about eroding US military supremacy? (Maybe Kerry went on the attack because he is stung from being derided for "looking French," by an unidentified White House official.)

It turns out that the former Vermont governor was quoted on Time.com as saying something eminently reasonable: "We have to take a different approach [to diplomacy]. We won't always have the strongest military." Some might consider this an alternative vision. I think it's just common sense. Dean's campaign manager, Joe Trippi, said all his candidate was saying was that Bush's foreign policy will ultimately leave the nation less safe in the war against terrorism by relying too heavily on military force at the expense of diplomacy.

So maybe we will find them yet,
Well stashed away in some place clever.
Or were they just destroyed in March?

Or never there at all? Whatever.

OR, 'THE GUILTY AGE'?

Skokie, Ill.

By focusing only on the worst-case scenarios regarding the spread
of SARS, the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease
Control are trying to control the populace through fear.

Forget truth. That is the message from our government and its apologists in the media who insist that the Iraq invasion is a great success story even though it was based on a lie.

Army Secretary Thomas White, the Enron executive who parlayed his skills at running private companies into bankruptcy into an important-sounding position in the Bush Administration, has stepped down. The official administration spin -- which was only slightly less credible than a press briefing from the former Iraqi Information Minister -- claimed that White quit. The reality was that Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, who thought of White as little more than a lobbyist for defense contractors promoting unnecessary investment in cumbersome weapons such as the canceled Crusader artillery system, fired the Army Secretary.

No one should mourn White's departure. His presence in the administration was Exhibit A for the case that the Bush team had bartered off positions of authority to hacks who saw government "service" as a means to enrich their corporate comrades -- and, ultimately, themselves.

There is one reason to hold back on celebrating White's departure, however. The primary effect of his exit will be to solidify Rumsfeld's control over all of the country's military affairs. With White out, and with the coming retirement of General Eric Shinseki, the Army chief of staff with whom Rumsfeld and his aides clashed, the Defense Secretary will be well positioned to nominate loyalists for the Army's top civilian position and the senior military slot.

No monument will improve the lives of tens of millions of people living below the poverty line or repair Russia's ravaged public health system, idle factories, decaying farms, polluted rivers, and collapsing educational system.

On April 11th--the day of the most widespread and uncontrolled looting in Iraq--Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld produced one of the more sour notes of the nascent postwar period.

If you'd like to add your name to this statement, e-mail leocasey@aol.com.

When Ayatollah Abdel Majid al-Khoei was stabbed to death earlier this month by a mob in Shiite Islam's holiest mosque, the bloody event was widely described as a blow to the forces of reconciliat

How much, in just twenty years, Donald Revell has changed! From the
Abandoned Cities
(1983), his debut volume, included a villanelle, a
sestina, rhymed sonnets and meditative terza rima.

Ever since Clark Kent first donned a pair of oversized glasses and,
somewhat improbably, hid his Superman persona from Lois Lane, questions
of identity have been a staple of the comic-book genr

Baghdad has fallen. The city has been taken by the troops who were
bringing it freedom.

The ravages of drought are evident to anyone traveling through Zimbabwe.
The carcass of a dead donkey lies on the road, while skeletal dogs tear
at its intestines.

It's a great country. Don't let the hucksters and charlatans take it
away.

How 'fighting terrorism' became a bludgeon in Bush's assault on labor.