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This article is based on a report originally produced for National
Public Radio's On the Media.

The day after the World Social Forum dialogues, I visited an encampment of landless people squatting in garbage-wrap tents alongside the road an hour from Porto Alegre.

Regardless of the outcome of weapons inspections, the Bush Administration seems poised to soon launch an invasion of Iraq. In response, the antiwar movement is gearing up for a series of nationwide protests, highlighted by major actions planned forFebruary 15.

A coalition of antiwar groups, United for Peace and Justice, is stagingwhat is likely to be a large and spirited event in New York City on the 15th. Mayor Bloomberg's office however has been so uncooperative that event organizers were forced to file a federal lawsuit last Wednesday against the City over its refusal to issue a march permit.

Permission was requested to assemble near the United Nations, followed by a short march through Manhattan to a rally location near Central Park. The City countered that only a "stationary event," not a march, would be permitted. The legal wrangling continues but the show will go on. People like Desmond Tutu, Julian Bond, Danny Glover, and Patti Smith are already signed on to partcipate and bus caravans are being organized nationwide.

Speaking to the United Nations on Wednesday, in an address that was broadly portrayed as a case for war with Iraq, Secretary of State Colin Powell argued that, "Iraq today is actively using its considerable intelligence capabilities to hide its illicit activities." To support that claim, Powell said, "I would call my colleagues attention to the fine paper that United Kingdom distributed yesterday, which describes in exquisite detail Iraqi deception activities."

It turns out, however, that much of that "fine paper" – a dossier distributed by the office of British Prime Minister Tony Blair under the title, "Iraq - Its Infrastructure of Concealment, Deception and Intimidation" – was not a fresh accounting of information based on new "intelligence" about Iraqi attempts to thwart UN weapons inspections. Rather, the document has been exposed by Britain's ITN television network as a cut-and-paste collection of previously published academic articles, some of which were based on dated material.

Substantial portions of the report that Powell used to support his critique of Iraq were lifted from an article written by a postgraduate student who works not in Baghdad but in Monterey, California, and who based much of his research on materials left in Kuwait more than a dozen years ago by Iraqi security services.

Secretary of State Colin Powell convinced me. I am ready to bomb Iraq and wipe out the terrorists. Allow me to explain.

It's not that an invasion an...

This "Opposing View" editorial was published first in USA Today on February 6, 2003.


SCURRILOUS ATTACK

New York City

Although the Bush Administration acts as if the war train has already
left the station, the antiwar forces continue to grow, and they are
mobilizing in large numbers for a worldwide protest on

George W. Bush's budget sketches the precipitous decline in our fortunes
on his watch, while blurring the full costs of his shameless pander to
privilege.

With up to 200,000 American and British combat troops already stationed
in or on their way to the Persian Gulf area, war with Iraq looks
increasingly imminent.

Like the perennial quest for a "Star Wars" antimissile system, the space
shuttle has never been an entirely rational program.

(With apologies to Cole Porter, the master, who wrote "My Heart Belongs to Daddy")

So Laura Bush will not, after all, be discussing the works of Emily
Dickinson, Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes with a selected group of
American poets at the White House on February 12.

I was standing in line for Bowling for Columbine in Brussels not
long ago with two writer/editor friends, when a 15-or-so-year-old
Belgian boy in front of us turned around and inquired,

Suddenly, there are serious discussions about the danger of monopoly power.

In 1992 Congress passed a law designed to increase the diversity of
television programming and to amplify traditionally underrepresented
voices.

The debate over the dangers of media monopoly got a lot less theoretical
in the last week of January, when Comcast, the nation's No.

Europeans opposed to war in Iraq are united by a deep distrust, even fear, of America.

This essay will appear as an introduction in New York Review Books' new
edition of Prisoner of Love (February 2003).

Last fall, a half-dozen child psychologists lurked around New York's
Yale Club at a convention called "Advertising & Promoting to Kids"
in search of new, higher-paying clients.

In classical dance, the art of imbalance--the pirouette, the jeté
or the mere ethereal, alighted walk that alone makes audiences feel they
are getting their money's worth--is the purview

Since few of us at The Nation speak Thai, I'm going to refer to
my favorite filmmaker of the month as Joe, which is the name actually
used in this country by Apichatpong Weerasethakul.