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Media reform still might not seem the sexiest topic but the people at Free Press have figured out to make the process fun. Hosts of what, by all accounts, was a fantastic and inspiring conference/party in Madison, Wisconsin in November of 2003, Free Press is pulling out all the stops for its second confab in St. Louis from May 13th to 15th.

Close to 2,000 attendees are expected to join an illustrious roster of lefty luminaries including Nation publisher Victor Navasky as well as Naomi Klein, John Nichols, Robert McChesney, Patti Smith, Al Franken, Jim Hightower, Amy Goodman, Laura Flanders, David Brock, George Lakoff, Robert Greenwald, Jenny Toomey, and many others for what will be the country's largest media conference.

There'll be panels, plenaries, speeches, book signings, workshops, music, readings and parties, all designed to further the critical goal of media reform in the US. Click here to see a full schedule of events. If you act quickly, you can still reserve a hotel room at a special conference rate. So take this opportunity to participate in America's foremost media reform event--and remind friends and colleagues to do the same.

An internal memo urges retaliation against graduate students who
want a union.

The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe has been
monitoring elections in emerging democracies ever since the fall of the
Berlin wall, but now it has done something different a

I'm writing this on the eve of "Justice Sunday"--a telecast being promoted by evangelical Christian conservatives who charge that Democrats opposing President Bush's judicial nominees are acting "against people of faith."

The Senate Republican's Defender of the Faith, Bill Frist, who supports a "culture of life" but not lively debate, is scheduled to join in this televised show--designed to smear those who have honest differences over policy issues as religious bigots. As the Boston Globe asked in a tough editorial attacking Frist's intolerance: "Will every political difference now open opponents to such accusations? And whose definition of 'faith' is in use here?"

These are scary times. The nation is in the control of extremists who want to merge church and state. A line is crossed when religion demonizes politicians of certain religion--or no religion--and when the church-state separation is breached by people believing that their God is better than another God.

The world Saul Bellow made.

Kevin Young updates the Harlem Renaissance for the hip-hop generation.

While Michael Jackson's 2005 trial was appalling, it was not the stuff of ordinary tabloid catharsis; there was not an unsullied soul within fifty miles of the courthouse.

Chinese activists oppose the "Washington Consensus."

Unocal's settlement with Burmese villagers may spur better corporate conduct.

MINORITY/MAJORITY

The Bush budget cuts programs for the hungry.

When it comes to ethics violations, the sky is no longer the limit.

Corruption is not a partisan issue.

In many ways, this Earth Day is a particularly somber occasion. After all, in the past year, we've seen repeated environmental debacles--most notably, the decision to open the Arctic National Wildlife Reserve (ANWR) to drilling for oil. But, with the determination of environmental activists and state legislatures that refuse to bow down to Bush, there are, as always, reasons for hope. Here are five of our top environmental victories in the last year.

** Clear Skies Initiative Dropped: Thanks to a 9-to-9 vote by the Environment and Public Works Committee, Bush's Orwellian-labeled bill--which would have loosened air pollution restrictions for power plants, factories and refineries--did not advance to the Senate. Without Clear Skies, we'll be much more likely to see, well, clear skies.

** Colorado Passes Renewable Energy Initiative: Colorado's Amendment 37, a precedent-setting victory for renewable energy, requires the state's largest electric companies to increase their use of renewable sources such as wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, and small hydro from less than two percent today to 10 percent by 2015. Amendment 37 is expected to save Coloradans $236 million by 2025, create 2,000 jobs, and significantly reduce gas prices in the state.

April 13, 2005, was a dark day for Democrats. As House Republicans gleefully passed legislation to repeal the estate tax permanently, 42 Democrats--about on...

TRADE AIN'T NOTHIN' IF IT AIN'T FREE

Washington, DC

Last month, with the Terri Schiavo case at its most hyped, two physicians, who also happen to be Republican legislators, offered free medical advice in an extraordinary melding of their legal and political vocations.

With nothing but a short videotape to aid them, Senator Bill Frist (R-TN), a heart and lung surgeon, and Representative Dave Weldon (R-FL), an internist, felt able to rebut the diagnoses of numerous neurological specialists who had examined Schiavo. The reps contended from their film viewing that she "[seemed] to respond to visual stimuli," cleverly suggesting, without actually asserting so, that the doctors on the case were wrong. Saying he "spoke more as a doctor than a senator," Frist went further, adding that "there seems to be insufficient information to conclude" that Schiavo was in a "persistent vegetative state" that would justify allowing her to die.

But maybe Frist and Weldon are on to something and this diagnoses-by-videotape is the wave of the future. And since these doctor-legislators seem so willing to help out needy citizens, why not consider clicking here to ask if they'd be willing to diagnose your ailment as well. With fifty million Americans currently uninsured, many folks could really use their pro bono expertise.