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"Social Security is the soft underbelly," says right-wing activist
Stephen Moore.

This was always a divided city, even before the wall against peace.

The West, the future and the political price of gun control.

Maybe, just maybe, the religious right and its Republican friends have
finally gone too far with the Terri Schiavo case.

Jeff Weise, teen slayer of ten, including himself, at the Red Lake
Indian reservation in northern Minnesota, was on Prozac, prescribed by
some doc.

SO MUCH FOR THE UN 'SCANDAL'

Who Made a
Neurological Diagnosis of Terri Schiavo After Watching a Video of Her, Reports on a Physical Examination He's Done of Jeb Bush, His
Potential Rival for the 2008 Republican Presiden

Some 57 million nonunion workers in the United States say they would
form a union tomorrow if given the chance, according to new poll
conducted in February by Peter D. Hart and Associates.

The editorial page of the New York Times recently led with a justifiably
outraged condemnation of George W.

The Terri Schiavo case goes to the heart of political choices confronting the country.

BEDTIME FOR GONZO

Boulder, Colo.

John Bolton is a bad penny. He keeps coming back. As I've written before, there are...

Item 1: Proving that the Republicans have no problem ignoring Biblical strictures against usury, the Congress passed a bankruptcy bill that makes life far more profitable for credit card companies and far more onerous for people who have fallen into debt. The government hasn't started building debtor's prisons or shipping off Mastercard defaulters to Australia yet, but more and more Americans will find themselves indentured servants to Visa as a result of this bill.

Item II: 48 towns in Vermont have called for the return of Vermont's National Guard troops. Army recruitment numbers have fallen off a cliff. Tours of duty in Iraq have been extended and extended again. Even the most hawkish neocons admit our forces are stretched to the breaking point.

These two news stories seem unrelated, but they are not.

Trying to follow the US policy on the proliferation of nuclear weapons is like watching a three-card monte game on a city street corner. Except the stakes are higher.

Jeremy Hinzman fled north rather than be deployed in a war he regards as a "criminal enterprise."

Adding a powerful establishment voice to the growing campaign against George Bush's appointment of John Bolton to be the next US ambassador to the United Nations, a group of 59 former American diplomats are urging the Senate to reject Bolton's nomination.

Echoing a host of liberal and centrist critics of the nomination, in a letter to Richard Lugar, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the diplomats--both Democrats and Republicans--call Bolton, "The wrong man for the position." The letter's criticisms dwell largely on what the ex-diplomats call Bolton's "exceptional record" of opposing American efforts to improve national security through arms control. (For more details on why Bolton is a terrible choice, read recent pieces by The Nation's UN correspondent Ian Willams and the magazine's Washington editor David Corn.)

Bolton is another in a line of extreme in-your-face nominees put forth recently by the White House. It's important to show that they face opposition. Lugar has scheduled hearings on April 7 for the Senate to debate Bolton's nomination. Click here to implore your Senators to oppose the nominee.

Think of Ann Veneman as the Paul Wolfowitz of food policy.

Just as Wolfowitz used his position as the Bush administration's deputy secretary of defense to spin whacked-out neoconservative theories into the justification for an illegal and unnecessary war, so Veneman used her position as the administration's secretary of agriculture to spin equally whacked-out theories about the genetic modification of food and free trade into disastrous policies for farmers and consumers.

And, just as Wolfowitz is being rewarded for his missteps and misdeeds with a prominent new position as president of the World Bank, so Veneman is also moving onto the world stage, as the likely nominee to be the next executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF).

After more than a week without food, the twenty-plus members ofGeorgetown's Living Wage Coalition started to have theirdoubts.

The students, who began a hunger strike on March 15th demanding that the university increase wages for its 450 contract custodians, food service employees, and security guards, had seen little sign of real compromise on the part of the administration. Two students had already been taken to the hospital, and others were suffering from dizziness, nausea, and blurred vision.

But the students persisted, and on Holy Thursday, America's oldestCatholic university officially agreed pay its contract workers aliving wage, increasing compensation from a minimum of $11.33 an hour to $13 by July and to $14 by July 2007.

What a month for the Green Mountain State. on March 18th, the VermontCatamounts stunned heavily favored Syracuse for their first NCAAtournament win in the team's 100-year history. And, on the day before UVM's historic win, working Vermonters enjoyed an even more meaningful sweet victory, as the state legislature gave preliminary approval to a bill that would raise the state's minimum wage to $7.25 per hour by 2006 and automatically increase it in years to come.

Boasting one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country--despite its already high (by national standards) minimum wage of $7 per hour--Vermont offers further proof that a higher minimum wage doesn't negatively impact the job market.

Vermont wasn't the only state to see a minimum wage boost last week. On March 14th, New Jersey voted to increase its minimum wage from $5.15 to $7.15 over the next two years. This is a dramatic improvement compared with the last time New Jersey raised the minimum wage--in 1999--by only ten cents.

A growing student movement is taking the company to task for its record on human rights around the globe.

When David Spencer Ware was a baby, his mother pronounced a blessing over him. Go See the World became the title of the saxophonist's first major-label record, for Columbia.

California inspires people to think big, and to write big books. Take, for example, Kevin Starr.

Saturday begins with its main character, Henry Perowne, getting out of bed because he's unable to sleep and going to stand by an open window.

Challenging a mistaken war can take more courage than fighting one.