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Guest worker programs are a threat to the communities Central American
migrants forge as they sweep across the US. These programs undermine
the economic rights of immigrants and natives alike.

As the Bush Administration's incompetence turns Iraq into a terrorist
training camp, Americans should look to FDR, who waged war for
unavoidable threats, not ideology, while still fostering good will
among US allies.

The Wicked Witch stomps in his defense and the wise old tortoise
explains his reasoning. But Mother Courage knows the truth behind
William Bennett's racist comments.

For working in the shadows of K Street pay-to-play, here's to The
Hammer getting the slammer.

Conservatives have undermined the credibility of the United Nations by
exposing corruption in its oil-for-food program. But the inquiry led by
Paul Volcker didn't look at the mishandling of billions of dollars in
oil-for-food surpluses given to US occupation forces or the alleged
looting of such funds by US companies.

Recent rulings upholding the right of the executive branch to jail and try terror suspects in military tribunals raise questions about whether the judiciary can keep presidential powers in check. Will a realigned Supreme Court give Bush a
blank check to rise above the law?

War hero and former NFL star Pat Tillman was not the GI Joe icon
created by Pentagon spinmeisters. He was a fiercely independent thinker
convinced that the war in Iraq was illegal. Bereaved military families,
also angered at Pentagon exploitation of their loved ones, are joining
the critical chorus.

Tom DeLay's indictments open the door for Congress to overhaul current
lobbying laws and fix the broken system of campaign finance,
redistricting and electoral laws that foster misconduct on both sides
of the aisle.

Democrats have a chance to stand up for competence, civil liberties and
the integrity of the Supreme Court by challenging Harriet Miers's lack
of credentials and blocking Bush from using the Supreme Court to expand
presidential powers.

Folks outside the Beltway often wonder why reporters--even those of a liberal bent--have a fondness for John McCain. Yeah, he's a warmonger in that he's bee...

MS. OLDS REGRETS

Stocks crash and housing prices tend to go down with a whisper. But a disturbing number of signs now point to a sudden burst of the real estate bubble.

You would hardly know it from watching the news or reading the papers, but there's a two-month-old hunger strike going on at Guantánamo Bay. After more than three years of internment without charges or trials, approximately forty detainees are striking for the right to a fair hearing before a judge.

The Pentagon is in denial about its violations of the Geneva Accords; the mainstream media are oblivious. As Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) staff attorney Gitanjali Gutierrez says, "It is astounding that men in US custody are willing to engage in a hunger strike until they are afforded a fair hearing or they die of starvation." But it's happening with no one paying all that much attention--except in Europe, Asia and the Middle East, where, as Clive Stafford Smith explaines in the Nation magazine, any US claim to be the standard-bearer of the rule of law has dissolved.

It's so bad even Thomas Friedman has called for closing the prisoners' camp. But Friedman's column last summer aside, this hunger strike really does seem to be the story America doesn't care about. And the Gitmo authorities, mindful of the bad publicity a detainee death by starvation would cause, are apparently force-feeding the hunger strikers to make sure we don't see a Muslim Bobby Sands.

In a scathing report issued on September 30, the Government Accountability Office's investigators said the Bush Administration had broken the law by using taxpayer dollars to disseminate "covert propaganda" in the United States.

The case in question involves the buying of favorable news coverage of the White House's education policies in the form of payments to conservative commentator Armstrong Williams and the hiring of a PR firm to analyze media perceptions of the Republican Party. (The GAO's ruling should lead the mainstream media to broaden its investigation: What other reporters and media outlets are on the government's payroll?)

But this is the tip of the proverbial iceberg. It's now clear that the Bush Administration represents a broad threat to a free and fair media. The bribing of journalists to report "friendly" news has to be put in the context of a decades-long effort by the right and its corporate allies to undermine journalists' ability to report fairly on power and its abuse--whether through consolidation, cutbacks in news budgets or by attaching the label "liberal bias" to even the most routine forms of news-gathering and reportage.

Faced with an historic opportunity to give gay couples equal protection under the law, Arnold Schwarzenegger proved he was made of bendable plastic.

Darwin's discoveries about evolution never argued
against the existence of God. And the theory of "intelligent design" is
a dangerous attempt to undermine science and justify a literal reading
of the Bible.

What's really shocking about Bill Bennett's public
fantasies of reducing crime by aborting black babies is the ease with which conservative critics cast lawlessness in racial terms.

More than three decades have passed since a President nominated someone without judicial experience to serve on the US Supreme Court.

The last such nominations--those of William Rehnquist and Lewis Powell Jr.--were announced on the same day, October 20, 1971, by then President Richard Nixon. Nixon had run into problems getting sitting federal judges placed on the high court. His nomination of Clement F. Haynsworth Jr., chief judge of the Fourth US Circuit Court of Appeals, to fill the seat left vacant by the resignation of Abe Fortas, was rejected by the Senate in 1969. A year later, the Senate turned down Nixon's nomination of G. Harrold Carswell, a judge on the Fifth US Circuit Court of Appeals, to fill the same vacancy.

In the fall of 1971, with vacancies created by the resignations of Justices John Marshall Harlan II and Hugo Black, Nixon opted for Rehnquist, an Arizona lawyer with close ties to conservative icon Barry Goldwater, and Powell, a former president of the American Bar Association. And, while the Rehnquist nomination created a bit of a stir, both men were confirmed before the year was out--giving Nixon a pair of "wins" in his long wrestling match with an overwhelmingly Democratic and ideologically muscular Senate.

Here we go again. Another pick for the Supreme Court without much--or, in this case, any--judicial experience. And that will make it hard for senators--or a...

New Orleans did not die an accidental death--it was murdered by
deliberate design and planned neglect. Here are twenty-five urgent
questions from the people who live in a city submerged in anger and
frustration.

In Washington, where it is exceeding difficult to get the political players or the press corps to pay attention to more than one story at once, no0 one would suggest that it was "smart politics" to deliver a major address on the day that House Majority Leader Tom DeLay being forced to step aside after being indicted on criminal conspiracy charges.

But sometimes the work of Washington involves more than political games.

Sometimes it involves life and death questions of national policy. And it is particularly frustrating in such moments to see vital statements about the nation's future get lost in the rush to discuss the scandal du jour. To be sure, the well-deserved indictment of DeLay merited the attention it received. But the indictment of President Bush's "stay-the-course" approach with regard to the Iraq War, which was delivered on the same day by U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold, D-Wisconsin, should have gotten a lot more attention than it did.

When you already have a fall guy, use him--especially if he's a dead man.

Could that be the legal strategy of I. Lewis Libby (a.k.a. Scooter), Vice ...