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As one of those pathetic evolutionary throwbacks who has never used e-mail or the Internet, and has hardly ever handled a mobile phone, I can approach this book with all the supreme disinterested

Since Fidel Castro's brief fainting spell during a speech in June 2001, Miami, Havana and Washington have been caldrons of feverish speculation on his succession and the politics of a post-Castro

This essay is adapted from Anatol Lieven's next book, America Right or Wrong: An Anatomy of American Nationalism, to be published this month by Oxford University Press.

Official dishonesty is never worthwhile.

Thanks to damage caps and other measures, victims are often unable to sue.

Democrats haven't made much of what would happen to the courts should Bush win a second term.

An oppressive and beleaguered empire, a terrorist international, a storm raging in the world press about torture, right-wing Christians on the march against moral decline and the collapse of fami

Washington editor David Corn has been named a fellow in the "Security and Liberty in the Post-9/11 Era" reporting program of the Institute for Justice and Journalism at the USC Annenberg School.

The longer the Bush Administration is in office, the clearer it becomes that it has a disordered relationship not just with one aspect of the world or another, such as the war in Iraq or the budg

That's excellent. So tell us: Why did you
For months imply the opposite was true?
And why does Cheney (Nanny Dick) still flog

On September 29 in San Francisco, 4,000 hotel employees--all members of the newly merged union UNITE HERE--walked out on strike or were locked out of their workplaces after their contracts expire

D.D. Guttenplan would like to thank Glenda Jackson MP for her assistance in gaining admission to the Labour Party Conference.

A culture war's going on. The 2004 election does not merely pit red states against blue states; it places the cultural community against the Bush establishment.

In his 1988 song "Waiting for the Great Leap Forwards," British troubadour Billy Bragg promised, "The Revolution is just a T-shirt away." It's taken a while, but the 2004 election could prove Bra

In The Nation's October 9, 2000, special report on the Supreme Court, Tom Wicker wrote, "No issue is more vital...repeat, no issue is more important than the makeup of the next Supr

A landslide of letters overwhelmed our mailbox in response to Ronnie Dugger's August 16/23 Our Readers and Ronnie Dugger

Does Dick Cheney know where he steered voters watching the vice presidential debate last night? In response to a series of attacks from John Edwards on Cheney's corrupt tenure as CEO of Halliburton, the vice president said that Kerry and Edwards "know the charges are false. They know that if you go, for example, to factcheck.com, an independent website sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania, you can get the specific details with respect to Halliburton."

The problem with Cheney's rebuttal was that he meant to say "factcheck.org," rather than "com." George Soros quickly capitalized on Cheney's error, snatched up the URL overnight, and now, if you click on factcheck.com, as many people have and will, you get redirected to. . . Oh, just go ahead and do it. This is too good to give away.

(Thanks to Washington Monthly blogger Kevin Drum for bringing this amusing item to the world's attention. Click here to read Drum's excellent blog.)

To hear Vice President Cheney tell it in Tuesday night's debate, Democrats like John Edwards and John Kerry are the only Americans foolish enough or unpatriotic enough to complain about the administration's management of the invasion and occupation of Iraq.

"You're not credible on Iraq," a scowling Cheney told Edwards minutes into this year's only vice presidential debate. The man whose imprint on the planning and implementation of the administration's Middle Eastern military misadventure has been far firmer than that of President Bush ripped into Kerry and Edwards repeatedly in the heated first half hour of the debate. "These are two individuals who have been for the war when the headlines were good and against it when their poll ratings were bad," Cheney said of the Democratic ticket, after speculating that pressure from Democratic primary rival Howard Dean -- as opposed to mounting death tolls and a general sense that the occupation had degenerated into a quagmire -- offered the only real explanation for why the Democratic ticket is now critical of the administration's approach to the war.

But, this time, the vice president had trouble peddling the big lie.

In Orlando, Florida just hours after the first presidential debate, a reinvigorated John Kerry told a crowd at Freedom High School that he had a message for every "middle-class American family that's struggling to build a better life for themselves and for their family: 'I've got your back.'"

It's not only a good soundbite, but a meaningful promise to the millions who've been squeezed tight by an Administration which treats the rich and the powerful as its base and the poor and middle class as its enemy. America wants to hear more. In the next two debates, Kerry has an opportunity to explain to the struggling and shrinking middle class--as well as the working poor--what he'll do differently to give hope back to the millions of Americans desperately struggling to survive.

Today, the Drum Major Institute (DMI)--the New York based non-partisan organization--released a list of ten smart, tough and pointed questions designed to help Americans better understand the candidates' positions on issues like job creation, expanded access to affordable health care, a restructured tax code and how Americans can cope with skyrocketing higher education costs.

Vice presidential picks haven't mattered in the past. And vice presidential debates haven't mattered. Neither will this one. Dick Cheney and John Edwards ea...

How free and fair is an election run by warlords?

It is difficult for members of the US Senate, where even the best are uncommonly proud, to admit that they are not always in the know. Perhaps that explains why Sen.