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Karl Rove has come under justified fire for once again trying to exploit 9/11 politically. At a speech on Wednesday night, Rove--who is now the White House ...

This August marks the fortieth anniversary of the passage of the Voting Rights Act. Upon sending the bill to Congress, Lyndon Johnson stated, "But even if we pass this bill, the battle will not be over. What happened in Selma is part of a far larger movement which reaches into every section and State of America…to secure for [African-Americans] the full blessings of American life. Their cause must be our cause too."

Yet, with approximately 4.7 million US citizens still disenfranchised--a vastly disproportionate number of them African-American--the promise of the Voting Rights Act remains unfulfilled. Today, 13 percent of all American black men are ineligible to vote due to draconian felony disenfranchisement laws.

But last week, Governor Tom Vilsack of Iowa announced that on July 4th, he will restore voting rights to thousands of Iowans, reversing an unjust state law that imposes lifetime disenfranchisement for anyone convicted of a felony

Articles on Bolivia, Pat Tillman and democracy in California attract comments and questions.

Rarely in recent years has Washington seen so dramatic a clash between the legislative and executive branches as was witnessed Thursday, when U.S. Senator Edward Kennedy, D-Masschusetts, went after Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld on the question of whether the Pentagon chief should resign for mismanaging the war in Iraq.

"This war has been consistently and grossly mismanaged. And we are now in a seemingly intractable quagmire. Our troops are dying. And there really is no end in sight," Kennedy said, as the Secretary of Defense sat opposite him during an appearance before the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Arguing that "the American people, I believe, deserve leadership worthy of the sacrifices that our fighting forces have made, and they deserve the real facts," Kennedy told Rumsfeld, "I regret to say that I don't believe that you have provided either."

Because of spotty enforcement, white-collar criminals are far more likely to get away with their crimes than poor folks.

Graham Greene remains a compelling figure in this moment of moral bankruptcy.

Novelist David Grossman discusses Israel and the role of politics in his writing.

Alan Dershowitz is on the defensive over his research on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

El Salvador today is an Exhibit A casualty of the American imperium.

Forty years after the now-famous murders of three civil rights workers, racism persists in Mississippi.

Reframing abortion takes the issue out of its real-life context, which is the experience of women.

As long as I've lived in America I've enjoyed the comic ritual known as
the "hunt for the smoking gun," a process by which our official press
tries to inoculate itself and its readers against p

Senate Dems defending privacy rights move toward the majority, while their opponents stay in the minority.

Despite alarmist talk, the European economy is not in shambles.

As its July convention approaches, the AFL-CIO is on the brink of a major break-up.

Bush's political capital can't buy him support on the Iraq war and Social Security.

INTRINSA--NOT SO FAST...

Washington, DC

It appears a grass-roots movement has started in Bolivia, which may ultimately prove more important than the ups and downs of any one party.

Several Republicans in Congress now recognize that the situation in Iraq is only getting worse.

Karl Rove is a hypocrite. I know that's hard to believe. And you're going to need a chunk of proof before accepting that conclusion. So let me give it my be...

On June 16, the House Appropriations Committee voted to slash funding for public broadcasting by more than $200 million for 2006. The cut--which, if implemented, would affect everything from "Clifford the Big Red Dog" to programming on small news outlets that serve rural and minority audiences--marked a devastating blow for public television and radio. The full House is expected to vote as soon as tomorrow.

Worse yet, the June 16 de-funding vote marked just one part of a larger assault on public broadcasting. Bush ally Kenneth Tomlinson, chairman of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), offered the latest example with the revelations that he hired a longtime GOP operative to track "anti-Bush" and "anti-Tom DeLay" comments by the guests of NOW with Bill Moyers. This move prompted Congressional calls for an investigation into charges that Tomlinson had become "a source of political interference" in public broadcasting and helped spark cries for his resignation from a host of public interest groups and politicians.

Free Press is one of a few national groups waging a major battle in defense of public broadcasting. With so much at stake in this debate, Free Press's efforts are more than worthy of support.

Mark Felt is one of only two people who has been prosecuted for COINTELPRO crimes.