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Christ's self-appointed spokesmen now
Within the GOP enwrap
These lapdogs in such numbers that
They must be running out of lap.

Nine years ago, when The Nation first went online, we thought putting up
selections from the magazine once a week constituted a major step into
the world of the web.

As part of a nationwide festival of tributes to Pete Seeger in 2005, Studs Terkel offered this essay on the life and times of an American balladeer.

I don't claim to be as good at interpreting the apocalyptic signs of Revelations as the Christian right or the entertainment executives at NBC, but there are portents that The Lord is getting tired of the people who keep using his name in vain. I'll report, you decide:

I. Tom DeLay's sleazy lobbyist pal and tourism operator, Jack Abramoff, is making plea-bargain-sounding remarks that DeLay knew about everything.

II. Dick Cheney's choice for UN ambassador, John Bolton, whose temper is only matched by his moustache, has been left hanging in the wind by the conscience of Republican George Voinovich, an event as miraculous as the parting of the Red Sea.

If their struggle is like the civil rights
movement, why do Christian-rightists like Tony Perkins have so
many racist friends?

Closeness, even friendship, with our former enemies.

Never underestimate the determination of Washington Democrats to try and snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.

Just as it was reported Tuesday that Americans strongly support the Democratic campaign to preserve the judicial filibuster -- and with it their ability of responsible senators to prevent the most rabid extremists from joining the federal bench -- so it was also reported that Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, was seeking a compromise on what ought to be a matter of principle. The compromise that Reid was advancing would have seen Republicans back off their push for a "nuclear option" to shut down filibusters in return for Democratic acquiescence to the GOP's demand that some of the White House's most objectionable judicial nominations be allowed to advance.

The good news is that Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tennessee, rejected the compromise. Frist, who is desperate to get in bed with the religious right in order to promote his 2008 presidential campaign, recognized that his political ambitions would be thwarted if he was seen to be compromising with the demonized Democrats. He also heard the message loud and clear from the White House, where political (and now domestic policy) czar Karl Rove indicated in an interview with USA Today that there is no taste for deal making on judicial nominees.

Has the United States become like ancient Rome, in love with costly conquest?

Media reform still might not seem the sexiest topic but the people at Free Press have figured out to make the process fun. Hosts of what, by all accounts, was a fantastic and inspiring conference/party in Madison, Wisconsin in November of 2003, Free Press is pulling out all the stops for its second confab in St. Louis from May 13th to 15th.

Close to 2,000 attendees are expected to join an illustrious roster of lefty luminaries including Nation publisher Victor Navasky as well as Naomi Klein, John Nichols, Robert McChesney, Patti Smith, Al Franken, Jim Hightower, Amy Goodman, Laura Flanders, David Brock, George Lakoff, Robert Greenwald, Jenny Toomey, and many others for what will be the country's largest media conference.

There'll be panels, plenaries, speeches, book signings, workshops, music, readings and parties, all designed to further the critical goal of media reform in the US. Click here to see a full schedule of events. If you act quickly, you can still reserve a hotel room at a special conference rate. So take this opportunity to participate in America's foremost media reform event--and remind friends and colleagues to do the same.

An internal memo urges retaliation against graduate students who
want a union.

The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe has been
monitoring elections in emerging democracies ever since the fall of the
Berlin wall, but now it has done something different a

I'm writing this on the eve of "Justice Sunday"--a telecast being promoted by evangelical Christian conservatives who charge that Democrats opposing President Bush's judicial nominees are acting "against people of faith."

The Senate Republican's Defender of the Faith, Bill Frist, who supports a "culture of life" but not lively debate, is scheduled to join in this televised show--designed to smear those who have honest differences over policy issues as religious bigots. As the Boston Globe asked in a tough editorial attacking Frist's intolerance: "Will every political difference now open opponents to such accusations? And whose definition of 'faith' is in use here?"

These are scary times. The nation is in the control of extremists who want to merge church and state. A line is crossed when religion demonizes politicians of certain religion--or no religion--and when the church-state separation is breached by people believing that their God is better than another God.

The world Saul Bellow made.

Kevin Young updates the Harlem Renaissance for the hip-hop generation.

While Michael Jackson's 2005 trial was appalling, it was not the stuff of ordinary tabloid catharsis; there was not an unsullied soul within fifty miles of the courthouse.

Chinese activists oppose the "Washington Consensus."

Unocal's settlement with Burmese villagers may spur better corporate conduct.