George Washington takes place in a small, weedy, rusty city in the American South, where children conduct their affairs with adult responsibility and adults behave like kids. The grown-ups had fought wars and built machines, explains Nasia (Candace Evanofski), the little girl who narrates the film in voiceover, so “it was hard for them to find their peace.” By contrast, the children dwell on problems of friendship, love and the care of small animals. These subjects lead not to turmoil but to the contemplation of “mysteries…all the mistakes God had made.”

Nasia doesn’t name these errors; but a moviegoer might draw up quite a list. God has allowed George Washington to be set in a city of empty storefronts, derelict factories, junkyards, railyards and tumbledown houses: places of abandonment and failure, which are lovingly photographed in warm sunlight and deep colors. Presiding over this America (at least in Nasia’s mind) is her friend George (Donald Holden), whose skull God forgot to fuse. George’s brain lies so near the surface that he has to go about wearing a football helmet. But despite his vulnerability–or because of it–George wants to be a hero, and Nasia sees him as one. The marvel of the movie is that you see George almost as she does, even while knowing that he’s a poor, scared, guilt-burdened kid.

On the level of knowledge–of meanings that can be paraphrased–George Washington is a mounting pile of disasters. Parents are dead, imprisoned or crazy; pets are candidates for slaughter; friends are one slip away from a violent end. The survivors, while not yet old enough for high school, ache with a secret conviction of sin, or else go numb and blame themselves for it.

But the movie doesn’t play at the paraphrasable level. As written and directed by David Gordon Green in his remarkable feature debut, George Washington is a languid series of impressionistic glances, many of them cast at subjects that seem lovely or droll. Scenes often fade to black, so they occupy their own little space. The performers (all of them nonprofessional) play-act with a sincerity (sometimes an abandonment) that makes each moment a piece of eternity. Music is used sparingly; and when it does come up, it’s generally in the form of a slow, two- or three-chord pattern that isn’t planning to go anywhere. Maybe a couple of the children want to skip town after their friend Buddy abruptly dies; but the sounds are content to cycle in the air, as if they feel what George and Nasia feel. The goodness that the kids hope to find, the love and heroism they seek, must be present here and now, if they exist at all.

Do they exist? The answer might be yes, if you smile when George puts on his superhero outfit–the football helmet, a uniform from the school wrestling team and a white sheet, tied around his neck as a cape–and pretends to direct traffic. Never mind that the traffic doesn’t need direction. George apparently believes he’s saving lives; and though his need for this belief is terrible, though circumstances have made the wrestling uniform a token of guilt, the camera nevertheless gazes up at him, admiring rather than belittling his solemn arm-waving.

This is irony reversed: a demonstration of the moral and imaginative strength of a character who is, in his material condition, weaker than the viewer. I might even say (to compare small things with great) that George takes on the role of Father of His Country much as Leopold Bloom assumes the mantle of Ulysses. For all we know, George’s ancestors were owned by the Father of His Country. (Like most of the film’s characters, George has African blood.) But in his own eyes and Nasia’s, there’s still freedom and glory to be found on Independence Day–though the parade, to us, may look comically shabby, though the city’s grown-ups doze off before the fireworks begin.

“Smile,” someone says to George as the film concludes. When a picture’s this good, that’s easily done.

By coincidence, October has brought another outstanding first feature about the sudden death of children in a garbage-strewn city. The setting of this picture is a slum in Glasgow, where a foul canal runs past row houses of brick, near the concrete towers of a housing project. The period is the recent past, when Tom Jones was the latest singing sensation, and a garbage strike had left the streets and lots heaped with vermin-infested rubbish. The title of the film is Ratcatcher; and the writer-director, Lynne Ramsay, promises to be a major talent.

She’s had the courage to make the worst happen within the first five minutes of the film. Young James (William Eadie) is tussling playfully with his friend Ryan Quinn when the latter goes down in the canal and doesn’t come up. James runs off in fear; and from then through the end of the film, he lives with his secret. You might even say that he walks around in the secret. Ryan’s mother gives him the shoes she’d been buying for her son at the very moment of his death. James accepts the gift, having no alternative, then slashes the uppers with broken glass.

As that action suggests, Ratcatcher is a far less dreamy film than George Washington. While Green chooses a vibrant rust as his predominant color, Ramsay calls up all the shades of mud. While George Washington takes place in sunshine–even the most awful setting is shot through with shafts of light–Ratcatcher is so muted that it might have been shot underwater. The world is drained of sensual pleasure; when James’s father brings home a can of pale blue house paint, which seems to have fallen off a truck, closer inspection proves he’s got industrial gray.

Don’t even think about seeing Ratcatcher if you dislike knowing that the film conforms to its title. But don’t stay away if the prospect of unrelieved grimness is what’s putting you off. The good news is that Ramsay has the idiosyncratic eye and mind of a young Jane Campion. She’s always picking out odd but telling details–a wedge of nylon stocking between the mother’s toes, a trickle of saliva along the slumbering father’s cheek–and showing them from punchy angles. She also has a talent for opening windows in the daily grind, to reveal sudden vistas of the wondrous. Ratcatcher is hardly the work of a whimsy merchant; and yet, at one point, James discovers a green field that’s as perfect as a picture on the wall, and is framed like one. At another moment, while witnessing one of the film’s many rodent deaths, he imagines a pet mouse’s trip to the moon.

Most important of all, Ramsay chooses to dramatize characters who are loving as well as damaged. James may have the low, dark hairline and bat ears of Franz Kafka (perfect attributes for a lad serving time in this penal colony); the young girl he falls for, Margaret Anne (Leanne Mullen), may be used as common property by a gang of toughs, whose preferred love nest is an outdoor privy; and yet, in a scene at the film’s heart, James and Margaret Anne can share a frolic in the bath, innocently enjoying one another and a rare body of nonlethal water. Even the grown-ups are granted such a measure of grace. Mother (Mandy Matthews) is at wit’s end, coping with the chaos and dangers of poverty; Father (Tommy Flanagan) is a philandering drunk. But late in the picture, after a rough night, they put on a Sinatra record and dance in a single shaft of light, surrounded by utter blackness; and for that long moment, while they clutch each other, the screen is suffused with unembarrassed warmth.

Ratcatcher is about the surprises that crop up and the hopes that remain alive after the worst has occurred. Tough, dour and open-spirited, it’s a welcome new entry in the smallest genre of cinema: pictures that become more interesting as they go on.

Noted with pleasure: My colleagues say that Bedazzled–Harold Ramis’s remake of the 1967 comedy–is not a masterpiece, and surely my colleagues are right. This tale of a sniveling schlep who sells his soul to the Devil, having despaired of getting laid in any other way, was far more theologically sound in the original. For one thing, the 1967 version was written by Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, who were known to have read books, and starred the innately sadistic Cook as the Devil and the innately floundering Moore as the schlep. For another thing, the original included a full-scale parade of the seven deadly sins, featuring Raquel Welch as Lust.

The new version dispenses with such medieval apparatus and casts today’s Raquel, Elizabeth Hurley, as the Devil. She’s a sport (as you know if you’ve seen the first Austin Powers movie) and seems to enjoy wriggling all relevant parts of her anatomy; but once you get past the sight gag, you realize she does most of her acting with her teeth. Hurley is a great biter and clacker.

But then there’s the schlep. He’s played by Brendan Fraser, who has become the pre-eminent big lug of contemporary American comedy. Bedazzled gives him the opportunity to play a computer nerd (the basic character), a Colombian drug lord, a New Age California simp, a loofah-brained basketball star, a hyperarticulate novelist in a great tuxedo and Abraham Lincoln, all of which roles he carries off with the ease and aplomb of George of the Jungle swinging smack into a tree. No, Bedazzled isn’t a masterpiece. But it’s a Brendan Fraser vehicle, and for that I’m grateful.