Quantcast

Remembering Howard Zinn | The Nation

  •  

Remembering Howard Zinn

  • Share
  • Decrease text size Increase text size

About the Author

Also by the Author

Victor Navasky on our friend and ally Don Shaffer, Sarah Woolf on Canada’s women premieres

John Nichols on the US Postal Service, Elana Leopold on rebel teachers in Seattle, Lucy McKeon on Ramarley Graham’s legacy, and the editors on Charlottesville’s anti-drone resolution

To commemorate the passing of the great Howard Zinn and the major impact he's had on so many thinkers and activists, The Nation asked friends of the magazine and of Zinn to offer remembrances of the man and his work. "Somehow, Howard Zinn was one of those people I just thought was immortal," wrote Nation columnist Patricia Williams. Anthony Arnove, Marian Wright Edelman, Tom Hayden, Steve Cobble, Kaveh Afrasiabi, Frances Fox Piven, John Cavanagh and others share their memories of Zinn, and the effect he had on their writing, lives and activism, below. If you, too, would like to contribute a recollection, please send us a web letter here. We'll publish additional contributions as they arrive.

Anthony Arnove
John Cavanagh
Marian Wright Edelman
Steve Cobble
Frances Piven
Kaveh L. Afrasiabi
Tom Hayden

 

 

Anthony Arnove

 

Co-director with Zinn of The People Speak

 

When a New York Times obituary writer contacted Howard Zinn a few months ago, explaining that he wanted to interview him for their files, Howard didn't miss a beat. "What's your deadline?" he asked. Sharing that story recently, a few of us out for dinner with Howard after a reading of Voices of a People's History of the United States with Harry Belafonte, who Howard had met that evening for the first time, could all laugh easily at the joke because we all felt that his obituary would not be written for many years to come. He had such a life force, such an energy, it seemed unthinkable we could all lose him when we did. Though Howard could easily have slowed down in recent years, especially after the loss of his remarkable life-partner, Roz, he didn't. Working with him on our documentary The People Speak, which aired on History in December and is out this month on DVD, I was constantly running to catch up. Having the privilege of working with Howard for much of the last decade of his remarkable life, I was able to observe his artful approach to politics. He made the most radical ideas seem commonsensical and gave people a sense that a life in struggle is the most meaningful and rewarding one imaginable. He gave us an idea of the kind of world we want, and why it's worth fighting for. Howard has left us a remarkable legacy and example, and through his work has also given us, to borrow a phrase from the socialist Raymond Williams, resources of hope. La lutta continua.

Back to list

 

 

John Cavanagh

 

Director, Institute for Policy Studies

 

As a college student in 1977, I joined the remarkable anti-nuclear power protest that brought several thousand people over and around the fences that guarded the grounds of the Seabrook nuclear power plant in New Hampshire. After creative assaults on the site from land and sea, we set up a tent city for several days before the NH National Guard carted us off to armories around the state. As I settled in to my tent, word spread that Howard Zinn was camped out in a tent not far away. He was famous even then, three years before his groundbreaking "Peoples' History," largely for his writing on civil rights and the Vietnam War. So, I walked over and introduced myself and we sat quietly and talked about the movements to end the Vietnam War, and about what we were trying to do to end nuclear power. He was modest and encouraging and full of wisdom. And, at Seabrook and elsewhere, without great fanfare, he was a participant in the history that he would later present, so convincingly, to millions of Americans.

Back to list

 

 

Marian Wright Edelman

 

President of the Children's Defense Fund

 

 

When Howard Zinn passed away on January 27 at age 87, the nation mourned the loss of a pioneering historian and social activist who revolutionized the way millions of Americans, especially young Americans, understand our shared history. His writings and work inspired millions of readers, but I was among the generations of students privileged to know him as a beloved teacher, mentor and friend. His first academic job after graduate study at Columbia University was at the historically black, all-woman Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, my alma mater. The tall, lanky professor and I arrived at Spelman together in 1956, I as a freshman and he as chair of the history department. He and his beautiful wife, Roslyn, and their two children, Myla and Jeff, lived in the back of Spelman's infirmary, where students always felt welcome to gather, explore ideas, share hopes and just chew the fat.

Howie encouraged students to think outside the box and to question rather than accept conventional wisdom. He was a risk-taker. He lost no opportunity to challenge segregation in theaters, libraries and restaurants, and encouraged us to do the same. The black Spelman establishment did not like Howard Zinn any more than the white establishment did. Later, after he joined the faculty at Boston University, its president, John Silber, disliked him just as much as Spelman's president Albert Manley did, because he made some teachers and administrators uncomfortable by challenging the comfortable status quo. We called him Howie and felt him to be a confidant and friend as well as a teacher, contrary to the more formal and hierarchical traditions of many black colleges. He stressed analysis over memorization; questioning, discussions, and essays rather than multiple choices and pat answers; and conveyed and affirmed my daddy's belief and message that I could do and be anything and that life was about far more than bagging a Morehouse man for a husband.

He lived simply and nonmaterialistically. I felt comfortable asking to drive his old Chevrolet to transport picketers to Rich's department store or to scout out other potential demonstration sites. He was passionate about justice and his belief in the ability of individuals to make a difference in the world. Not a word-mincer, he said what he believed and encouraged us as students to do the same.

He conveyed to me and to other students that he believed in us and that we were powerful and not helpless to change what we did not like. He conveyed to members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (whose voter registration and organizing efforts he chronicled in his book SNCC: The New Abolitionists) that he believed in, respected and supported our struggle. He was there when two hundred students conducted sit-ins and seventy-seven of us got arrested. He provided us a safe space in his home to plan civil rights activities by listening and not dictating and always kept our secrets from the administration. He laughed and enjoyed life and taught us that it could be fun to challenge the status quo. What fun it was to visit the Georgia state legislature, sit in the whites-only section, watch the floor proceedings screech to a halt and hear the frantic gaveling and demands to "move those people to where they belonged." With Howie, we would then saunter out with smiles on our faces to dream about the next adventure.

He spoke up for the weak and little people against the big and powerful people just as he did his whole life. An eloquent and prolific chronicler of the people's history of the United States, of the civil rights movement, and of the longings of the young and the poor and the weak to be free, his most profound message and the title of one of his books is that "you can't be neutral on a moving train." You can and must act against injustice.

Howie taught me to question and ponder what I read and heard and to examine and apply the lessons of history in the context of the daily political, social and moral challenges all around us in the South, such as racial discrimination and income inequality. He combined book learning with experiential opportunities to engage in interracial discussions, partnered with community groups challenging legal segregation and engaged students as participants, observers, data collectors and witnesses in pending legal cases. He listened and answered questions as we debated strategies for conducting sit-in demonstrations to challenge segregated public dining facilities and used his car to check out, diagram, and help choreograph planned civil rights events. He reassured us of the rightness of our case when uncertainty and fear crept in and some of our college presidents sought to dampen our spirits and discourage our activities.

In short, he was there for and with us through thick and thin, focused not just on our learning in the classroom but on our learning to stand up and feel empowered to act and change our own lives and the community and region in which we lived. He taught us to be neither victims nor passive observers of unjust treatment but active and proud claimants of our American birthright. Howie helped prepare me to discover my leadership potential. I was so blessed to have Howie Zinn as a teacher and lifelong friend and will miss him deeply.

 

Back to list

 

 

Steve Cobble

 

Associate fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, co-founder of the Progressive Democrats of America (PDA)

 

One of the greatest vacation memories I have is three decades ago, a two-day summer downpour in Nova Scotia, my wife and I tent camping in a provincial campground. We ended up spending much of the rainstorm reading from a pile of books we'd been meaning to catch up on. But we had to keep trading The People's History of the United States back and forth after each chapter, because neither one of us wanted to put it down.

The People's History taught me that change comes from the bottom up, often with the assist of inspired leadership, but not from leaders alone. That lesson from Howard Zinn is a good one to hang onto, in a country where the US Supreme Court just gave the corporation that owned the tea the same electoral free speech rights as the patriots who threw the tea into Boston Harbor, before the Revolution.

Back to list

  • Share
  • Decrease text size Increase text size

Before commenting, please read our Community Guidelines.