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Only We Who Guard The Mystery Shall Be Unhappy | The Nation

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Only We Who Guard The Mystery Shall Be Unhappy

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This scene is the first of a new play titled Only We Who Guard the Mystery
Shall Be Unhappy
. No performance or reading of this work may be given
without express permission of the author, which will be happily granted
to anyone wanting to use it at antiwar events. For permission please
contact him at: MysteryGuardians@aol.com.

At the close of George W. Bush's news conference after the Republican sweep of Congress last month, a reporter asked what the president had given his wife for their 25th anniversary, Nov. 5, which the couple celebrated at the White House. Mr. Bush, who was by then out of camera range, responded with a lascivious wink, prompting startled laughter from reporters who had no trouble figuring out what he meant. --Elisabeth Bumiller
New York Times Book Review, December 1, 2002

About the Author

Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner’s most recent work includes the new play The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide to Capitalism and...

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(Three children in pajamas and bathrobes sit in small chairs in a neat row. Behind them, an angel is standing. Before them, facing them, a large comfortable armchair, unoccupied. Beautiful light.
      The angel is, and remains throughout the play, unfailingly kind and polite.)

ANGEL:

Dear Children. Please rise and give a warm welcome to our distinguished visitor, the First Lady of the United States, Mrs. Laura Welch Bush.

(The children rise, wave their arms excitedly, open their mouths to cheer. The only sound they make is the bird music from Olivier Messiaen's Saint François d'Assise.

Laura Bush enters, dressed in a purple plaid ensemble, carrying a book. She speaks with a gentle Texas drawl. She is a very nice lady. The children cheer and cheer.
       She stands in front of the armchair. She motions for the children to stop cheering and sit.)

ANGEL:

Sit, children.

(They do.)

LAURA BUSH:

Why thank you children. I don't believe I've ever had a more beautiful welcome, really really lovely. But... May I ask?

ANGEL:

Please.

LAURA BUSH:

Most of the kids I meet when I visit for a reading program--and I do so many of these, I love reading to kids, I meet so many kids--but most of the kids are, are wearing----

ANGEL:

They aren't usually wearing pajamas?

LAURA BUSH:

No, they aren't! They...well, they wear uniforms! Or if they go to a school that doesn't require uniforms, they wear, well of course you like to see them dressed neat, I do, but you know they'll wear all sorts of things. Except PJs. I just never saw that before. It's sweet.

ANGEL:

Perhaps this is the first time you have read to dead children, Mrs. Bush?

LAURA BUSH:

Perhaps it is! And I have to admit, children, I'm nervous. I've never met actual dead children before. Nor actual children from Iraq. Before I met my husband I traveled all over, children, all over the world, and since we moved into the White House I have also traveled, but never to Iraq. So you are the first Iraqi children I've met and you look real sweet in your PJs. And I'm sorry you're dead, but all children love books. All children can learn to love books if you read to them. That's why I've come--to read to you, to share one of my favorite books with you, because when a parent reads to a child, or any adult reads to a child, even if that child is dead, the child will learn to love books, and that is so, so important. (To one of the children:) How did you die, darling?

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