With legislative remedies falling far behind the threat of climate change, nonviolent direction action is increasingly being seen as the critical next step for environmental activists and advocates.

Filmmaker Emily James spent more than a year embedded with British activist outfits like Climate Camp and Plane Stupid to document their clandestine activities and offer unprecedented access to a community of people who refuse to sit back and tolerate the destruction of their world.

Her resulting film, Just Do It, currently playing in theaters in the UK, lifts the lid on climate activism and the daring troublemakers who have crossed the line to become modern-day outlaws. The film follows these activists as they blockade factories, protest corporate conferences, sabotage coal stations and glue themselves to the trading floors of international banks, all with “manners, courage and humor,” as activist Marina Pepper explains in the doc. (This BBC interview with James and Pepper tells more about the making of the film.)

Alternately entertaining and inspiring, Just Do It is a call to action that’s difficult to ignore, if not refuse.

Staying true to its principles, the doc was made possible thanks to the generosity of almost 500 smallish donors, an army of more than 100 volunteers, and numerous indie film giants, all of whom generously donated their time, expertise and connections.

Now James is hoping to bring Just Do It to the US and she needs our help. The goal is to hit US film festivals in the late fall and spark some attention and momentum for a limited theatrical release, grassroots house parties and a college and university tour.

There are numerous ways to support the project: Help fund a North American release. All donations, no matter how small, really help; Spread the word about the film to your friends, family and social networks, and/or volunteer your time to become a distribution assistant—everyone can participate regardless of experience or lack thereof. Let’s get this film to North America!

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