Coming right off of March Madness, the Bush Administration has launched its latest assault on Title IX, the law that ensures equal opportunities for men and women in schools that receive federal funds.

Recently, the Education Department issued rules that will allow colleges to use email surveys to determine interest among young women in playing sports. “Schools will be considered in compliance with Title IX legislation if survey responses suggest there is insufficient interest among women students to support a particular sport,” the Washington Postreported. Such changes to Title IX “will likely reverse the growth of women’s athletics and could damage the progress made over the last three decades,” NCAA President Myles Brand has said.

I’m the proud mother of a thirteen year old basketball player, who’s been the shooting guard for the last few years on her school team. Her dream is to make varsity this fall. She reads the sports section every morning. She knows stats I’ve never heard of, has watched the entire NCAA season and catches every NBA and WNBA game she can.

Millions of young women have reaped enormous benefits since Title IX was launched. The number of women playing high school sports increased in 2001 to almost 2.8 million, up from 294,000 in 1972. Over the same time colleges witnessed an almost five-fold increase in the number of women playing sports. Title IX has achieved “an explosion of female Olympic stars, college and professional women’s teams playing to packed stadiums, new magazines aimed at female athletes But most of all the freedom, strength and joy of a whole generation of young women,” journalist Ruth Conniff pointed out in 1997–in a special Sports issue of The Nation (yes, check it out!).

Jocelyn Samuels, the Vice President for Education and Employment at the National Women’s Law Center, pointed to the larger issue that “there have been attacks on Title IX since its inception in 1972, but the Congress has rejected those attacks and the courts have rejected these attacks, and every Administration until the present one has upheld Title IX.”

In the 2000 presidential campaign, then-candidate Bush told reporters that he “opposed quotas or strict proportionality” in school sports, taking a veiled swipe at Title IX. In Jan., 2002, his true agenda emerged when the National Wrestling Coaches Association (NWCA) filed