When Congress voted to authorize the Bush Administration to use military force in response to the September 11 terror attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Representative Barbara Lee stood alone in opposition to what she saw as a “rush to judgment.” Lee, the California Democrat who holds the Bay Area seat once occupied by antiwar activist Ron Dellums, spoke with John Nichols, The Nation‘s Washington correspondent, this week.

THE NATION:

How did you reach the decision to oppose authorizing the use of force?

LEE:

I was at the National Cathedral in Washington. I went to the memorial service on the Friday after the attacks and I prayed. I said to myself, “You’ve got to figure this one out.” I was dealing with all the grief and sorrow and the loss of life, and it was very personal because a member of my staff had lost a cousin in the Pennsylvania crash. I was thinking about my responsibility as a member of Congress to try to insure that this never happens again. I listened to the remarks of the clergy. Many of them made profound statements. But I was struck by what one of them said: “As we act, let us not become the evil that we deplore.” That was such a wise statement, and it reflected not only what I was feeling but also my understanding of the threats we continue to face. When I left the cathedral, I was fairly resolved.

THE NATION:

Were you also concerned about the constitutional implications of the vote?

LEE:

Absolutely. Given the three branches of government, and given that each has a role in the making of monumental decisions such as this, I thought the Congress had a responsibility in this instance especially to step back and say,”Let’s not rush to judgment. Let us insist that our democracy works by insuring that the checks and balances work and that the Congress is a part of the decision-making process in terms of when we go to war and with whom…. I think we disenfranchised the American people when we took their representatives out of the decision-making on whether to go to war with a specific nation.

THE NATION:

Were you surprised that no other members of Congress voted with you?

LEE:

It never dawned on me that I would cast the only vote against this resolution. Many members asked me to change my position. They were friends, and they said, “You do not want to be out there alone.” I said, “Oh, no, don’t worry. There will be others.” When there weren’t, I said, “Oh my God.” I could not believe it. It was an awesome feeling. And a lonely feeling.

THE NATION:

You mentioned that other members said, “You don’t want to be out there alone.” Do you think other members shared your concerns but were unwilling to cast a risky vote with emotions running so high?

LEE:

If you read the floor statements. you’ll see that there are many members of Congress who share my concerns. I think that, when I cast that vote, I was speaking for other people in Congress and outside Congress who want a more deliberative approach.

THE NATION:

At the same time, you have received precisely the sort of criticism that most politicians fear.

LEE:

I’ve been called a traitor, a coward, a communist, all the awful stuff. It’s been quite difficult for me. But I still believe that I cast the right vote. My district, I think, understands this vote…. I’ve gotten probably 20,000 e-mails. At first, there were a lot of very harsh messages. But now we are hearing more from people who are saying, “Yes, let’s use some restraint. Yes, let’s break the cycle of violence if we can.” I think the further we get away from that tragic day, the more we will hear those voices of reason.